meet the firefly artists

 

 

kate sydney

I began making jewelry at twelve years old when my mom and I discovered a bead store right here in Northport, NY. The owner showed me a few basics of earring and necklace making. I remember the first beads I bought were green and purple, a color combination that is still one of my favorites. From then on, we were hooked. My mom dug out old glass beads and strings of costume pearls; all were destined for new construction. Of course my style has evolved significantly since then, but I still love to re-purpose and reuse materials.

I love the possibility of it all. When I sit down to work, I never quite know where it will lead. My inspiration comes from my world around me. I’m often intrigued by layers and layers of leaves on trees, swirling vines, and endless flower petals. I love to be humbled by nature, to remember that we haven’t invented a single color or shape, to know that they all existed and we’re merely mirroring nature’s creations. I find beauty everywhere, most of it fleeting and precious. By channelling that beauty into a piece of jewelry, I feel as if I can harness the moment and make it last forever.
In my jewelry I use all sterling silver, semi-precious stones, and freshwater pearls. Sometimes I find shells and glass I like to use; a side effect of growing up by the sea. I use only the best materials to make my pieces as sturdy as possible, but to also maintain the integrity of their delicate nature. I hope you enjoy!

www.katesydney.com

 


 

jennifer stearns lau

I began my career as a graphic designer. Over the years, my experience expanded to include all aspects of marketing including brand development, web design and art directing photo shoots. After winning the 2005 Gilroy Garlic Festival Poster Contest with a design that featured a rustic sepia image of garlic bulbs, I considered pursuing photography as more than a hobby.
My portfolio includes subjects such as landscapes, race horses, vintage cars and portrait photography. Photography shows include Northport Arts Coalition at Northport Tasting Room and Wine Cellar in July 2011, Huntington Arts Council Art-rium in 2011, Northport Photography Show at the Northport Tasting Room and Wine Cellar in 2008, Suffolk County Historical Society in 2008.
Several of my images have appeared in the 2009 and 2010 Northport Calendars. I also regularly utilize my images in marketing pieces I develop for her clients. In my Printers Type series, I uses a macro lens to capture the Copperplate, 12 point blocks of type that are about 1/8” in height. These letters were in a printers chest that I purchased in a dusty basement from a tag sale in a Lewis Avenue, Northport home. Custom images created in this format are available.

My children have been by my side as I have developed my career as a photographer, which is why it is so hard to find a photo of me that they are not in!

www.jenniferlauphotography.com

 


 

 

beth atkinson

I have been surrounded by art my entire life. I come from a family of artists who have worked in just about every medium possible so that has made it very easy for me explore any material I desired. I consider myself primarily a printmaker working in etching, woodcut, linoleum, silkscreen and monotypes but I also work in book arts, collage and sculpture as well.
My first love in printmaking was working with relief prints. Carving from linoleum and wood was therapeutic for me. The smell of the wood and the way the knives cut through the material to create the image connected me to my art and made what I did complete for me. The process was just as important and the product. My prints are done in very small editions and most pieces are one of a kind as I usually embellish each print individually which makes each piece unique in its own right.
Much of the work that I do is influenced by my travels and are reflective of my visual and emotional experiences. Some of the work that I create is extremely realistic and detailed and other pieces are more abstract focusing on line and color.
My sculptural pieces are assemblages of ephemera and most of them connect to book arts which is another love of mine. I have always been a collector, saving scraps of paper from different events, ticket stubs, old photographs, small tokens and pieces of my past, pieces of these stories, never able to throw anything away because I was married to the memories that they held. As my art has evolved these pieces of ephemera became a focal point of some of my work. Frequently I assemble these pieces to create a story that is personal to me but may make the viewer create one of their own, maybe triggering a memory from their past as well.
As a whole the variety in my work can best be described as eclectic, but all of the imagery has a connection to what I have experienced through my relationships and travels.

www.bethpatkinson.com

 

 

james darcy

Born in Ipswich, MA, I grew up in Rockport and Gloucester, an area rich in the tradition of both fishing and art on the north shore of Massachusetts. The rugged coast and fishing industry would influence many of the topics I choose to capture in both my painting and printing.

As a young boy, I studied art in high school and worked at the Rockport Art Assiociation, setting up shows and doing odd jobs. It was here that I was influenced by many of the lcoal artists. I was privileged to learn and work with such artists as Stow Wengenroth, Don Stone and John Terelak.

I worked in the commerical fishing industry as a young man and moved to New York in 1983. I began working in constrution and settled in Northport to raise my family because of the similarities it had to my hometown. I worked a s a Ironworker in NYC, then as a carpenter in both NYC as well as Long Island.
Due mainly to health issues I resumed my artwork in earnest several years ago, wiht concentration in watercolor, graphic art and etchings. The art of plate etching and stone lithography is becmoming a lost art due to the increased use of computer imaging. It brings me joy and fulfillment to share my printmaking with others, and to keep the old ways and traditions alive.